Phase I (2011-2012)

The summary report from Phase I of the inquiry concluded that demands were indeed growing, driven by a number of factors, but information about actual practices was fragmentary and laws were often so vague that it was difficult to assess government demands. All papers are available for free to the public at http://idpl.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/4.toc

Fred H. Cate, James X. Dempsey, and Ira S. Rubinstein – Guest Editorial – Systematic government access to private-sector data

  • Peter Swire – From real-time intercepts to stored records: why encryption drives the government to seek access to the cloud 

  • Jane Bailey – Systematic government access to private-sector data in Canada
  • Zhizheng Wang – Systematic government access to private-sector data in China
  • Ian Brown – Government access to private-sector data in the United Kingdom
  • Motohiro Tsuchiya – Systematic government access to private-sector data in Japan
  • Stephanie K. Pell – Systematic government access to private-sector data in the United States
  • Fred H. Cate and Beth E. Cate – The Supreme Court and information privacy
  • Dan Jerker B. Svantesson – Systematic government access to private-sector data in Australia
  • Omer Tene – Systematic government access to private-sector data in Israel 

  • Paul M. Schwartz – Systematic government access to private-sector data in Germany
  • Sunil Abraham and Elonnai Hickok – Government access to private-sector data in India